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Microbial Ecology

, Volume 78, Issue 3, pp 565–574 | Cite as

Cultivation Intensity in Combination with Other Ecological Factors as Limiting Ones for the Abundance of Phytopathogenic Fungi on Wheat

  • Josef HýsekEmail author
  • Radek Vavera
  • Pavel Růžek
Fungal Microbiology

Abstract

In field and laboratory experiments during 2014–2017, we investigated the influence of lower and higher cultivation intensity of wheat and ecological factors (weather—temperature and rainfalls, year) on the occurrence of phytopathogenic fungi on the leaves of winter wheat. The prevailing fungi in those years were Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) J. Schrott and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died.) Drechsler. Using cluster analysis, we statistically evaluated interrelationships of known factors on the abundance of the fungi on leaf surfaces. Our results showed strongest correlation with Mycosphaerella graminicola and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis abundance to be with lower cultivation intensity and year done by the temperature and the rainfalls. The two pathogens—Puccinia tritici Oerst and Hymenula cerealis Ellis & Everh. occurred only very sparsely in some years and had little positive or negative correlation with named factors. The semi-early and semi-late winter wheat varieties Matchball, Annie, Fakir, and Tobak were used for our experiments. Higher cultivation intensity had protective effect against leaf phytopathogenic fungi.

Keywords

Winter wheat Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Mycosphaerella graminicola Hymenula cerealis Puccinia tritici Cultivation intensity Temperature Rainfalls Cluster analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank to Dr. Jan Lukáš for statistical support at the evaluation of our results.

Funding Information

The authors are grateful for the financial support of this work provided by the Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic No: MZe-RO0418.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Statement

This article does not concern any studies performed by any of the authors involving human participants or animals.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Crop Research Institute (CRI)Prague 6Czech Republic

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