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Pediatric Cardiology

, Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 226–229 | Cite as

Anomalous Connection of the Right Superior Vena Cava to the Left Atrium in a Child with Bilateral Superior Vena Cavae: An Unusual Cause of Cyanosis

  • Saad KhoshhalEmail author
Case Report

Abstract

Anomalous drainage of the right superior vena cava into the left atrium (LA) has been previously reported in the medical literature. We present a unique case of a child who had two superior vena cavae, a left superior vena cava that drained normally through the coronary sinus to the right atrium, and a right superior vena cava that drained anomalously to the LA.

Keywords

Abnormal systemic venous return Cyanosis Congenital heart disease 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author deeply thanks Dr Syed Aitizaz Uddin, Consultant Cardiac Surgeon, and Dr. Mohamed Mofeed Morsy, Professor of Pediatrics and Pediatric Cardiology Madinah Cardiac Center in editing and improving the linguistics of this scientific paper.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed parental consent was obtained.

Supplementary material

Video S1—Subcostal short-axis transthoracic echocardiographic view showing the right superior vena cava (RSVC) connected and draining to the left atrium (LA) with absence of a normal RSVC connection and drainage to the right atrium (RA) (MP4 7815 KB)

Video S2—Subcostal short-axis transthoracic (color Doppler) echocardiographic view showing the RSVC connected and draining to the LA with absence of a normal RSVC connection and drainage to the RA (abbreviations as in video 1) (MP4 5153 KB)

Video S3—Transesophageal bicaval echocardiographic view after a saline injection (bubble test) in the right arm shows opacification of the LA initially rather than the RA, confirming an RSVC connection and drainage to the LA (RA opacified later through a patent foramen ovale (PFO) (abbreviations as in video 1) (MP4 11575 KB)

Video S4—Transesophageal bicaval echocardiographic (zoomed view) after a saline injection (bubble test) in the right arm shows opacification of the LA initially rather than the RA, confirming an RSVC connection and drainage to the LA (RA opacified later through (PFO) (abbreviations as in videos 1 and 3) (MP4 15106 KB)

Video S5—RSVC angiography (using 4 Fr access to the right jugular vein) showing that the RSVC is connected to the LA, which is connected to the left ventricle. Another catheter is placed in the left SVC, which drains into the RA through a dilated coronary sinus (abbreviations as in video 1) (MP4 7131 KB)

Video S6—Left superior vena cava angiography (LSVC) showing the LSVC draining in the right atrium through a dilated coronary sinus (MP4 6921 KB)

246_2018_2013_MOESM7_ESM.mp4 (1.3 mb)
Video S7—Surgical view showed RSVC connected and draining to the LA before surgical correction (abbreviations as in video 1) (MP4 1378 KB)
246_2018_2013_MOESM8_ESM.mp4 (898 kb)
Video S8—Surgical view showed RSVC connected and draining normally to the RA after surgical rerouting of RSVC to RA (abbreviations as in video 1) (MP4 898 KB)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Cardiology, College of MedicineTaibah UniversityMadinahKingdom of Saudi Arabia

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