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Heat and Mass Transfer

, Volume 55, Issue 2, pp 341–351 | Cite as

Effects of radiation and magnetic field on mixed convection flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids across a cylinder in the presence of chemical reaction

  • Nepal C. Roy
  • Rama Subba Reddy GorlaEmail author
Original
  • 157 Downloads

Abstract

The effects of thermal radiation, magnetic field and chemical reaction on momentum, heat and mass transfer of mixed convection flow of a non-Newtonian power-law fluid across a horizontal cylinder are presented. Governing equations have been reduced to a set of dimensionless equations using appropriate transformations. The resulting equations are solved employing an implicit finite difference method up to the point of boundary layer separation. For the non-Newtonian fluids, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number demonstrate completely different characteristics from the Newtonian fluids near the front stagnation point. The magnetic field parameter produces lower skin friction, heat transfer, and mass transfer, whereas these are increased for the thermo-solutal parameter and the mixed convection parameter. The skin friction and the Nusselt number are found to decrease and the Sherwood number increases with an increase of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction parameter. Moreover, the conduction-radiation parameter generates higher skin friction and mass transfer and lower heat transfer rate.

Nomenclature

B0

Strength of magnetic field

C

Concentration of the fluid

Cf

Local skin friction

D

Coefficient of mass diffusivity

F

Dimensionless stream function

g

Acceleration due to gravity

K

Fluid consistency index for power-law fluid

k*

Rosseland mean absorption coefficient

M

Magnetic field parameter

N

Thermo-solutal convection parameter

Nu

Local Nusselt number

n

Flow-index for power-law fluid

Pr

Generalized Prandtl number

qr

Radiative heat-flux along the y-direction

R

Radius of the cylinder

Re

Generalized Reynolds number

Ri

Mixed convection parameter

Rd

Conduction-radiation parameter

Sc

Schmidt number

Sh

Local Sherwood number

T

Temperature

T

Ambient temperature

u

Velocity component in the x-direction

ue

Local velocity at the outer boundary of the edge

v

Velocity component in the y-direction

X

Dimensionless distance (=x/R)

x

Distance along the surface of the cylinder from the forward stagnation point

Y

Dimensionless distance normal to the surface of the cylinder

y

Distance normal to the surface of the cylinder

Greek symbols

Ω

Chemical reaction parameter

α

Thermal diffusivity

βC

Volumetric coefficient of concentration expansion

βT

Volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion

θ

Dimensionless temperature

κc

Thermal conductivity

κr

Rate of chemical reaction

ρ

Density of the fluid

σc

Electrical conductivity

σ*

Stefan–Boltzman constant

ϕ

Dimensionless concentration

ψ

Stream function

Subscripts

w

Wall condition

Ambient condition

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of DhakaDhakaBangladesh
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA

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