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Wood Science and Technology

, Volume 52, Issue 5, pp 1331–1341 | Cite as

Comparative characterization of ethanol organosolv lignin polymer from bamboo green, timber and yellow

  • Wenbo Zhang
  • Genlin Tian
  • Andrea Polle
  • Dennis Janz
  • Dejuan Euring
  • Xianghua Yue
  • Hansheng Zhao
  • Benhua Fei
  • Zehui Jiang
Original
  • 153 Downloads

Abstract

In order to make better use of bamboo resources in industrial processes, it is necessary to understand its recalcitrant morphological stem structure and unique chemical composition. In the present work, microspectroscopic imaging approaches were used to reveal the heterogeneous distribution of lignin at cellular and subcellular level. Results showed the higher lignin concentration in the narrow layer of fiber and parenchyma secondary cell walls. Furthermore, ethanol organosolv lignin, isolated from different zones of the bamboo vascular tissue [outer (green), middle (timber) and inner (yellow)], was subjected to extensive structural characterization, including chemical component analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main chemical differences among the green, timber and yellow zone were sugar content and S/G/H ratios. Since bamboo green had higher density, hardness and lignin content than bamboo timber and bamboo yellow, the mass transfer during the organosolv process was limited and resulted in the reduced removal/dissolution of polysaccharides at the same acidic conditions. Because bamboo green exhibited the highest content of G units in the vascular tissue, it was more condensed and thus had increased thermal stability compared to bamboo timber and bamboo yellow.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper is the result of collaboration between research teams at the International Centre for Bamboo and Rattan (ICBR). The work presented is supported by ICBR Fundamental Research Funds Grant (No. 1632016012) and the National Key Technology R&D Program of China during the 12th 5-year Plan Period (2015BAD04B03). We also gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Prof. Xiaomei Jiang, who gave me more suggestion for the cell structure. Research conducted in Professor Andrea Polle’s laboratory was supported by Georg-August University Göttingen and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenbo Zhang
    • 1
  • Genlin Tian
    • 1
  • Andrea Polle
    • 2
  • Dennis Janz
    • 2
  • Dejuan Euring
    • 2
  • Xianghua Yue
    • 3
  • Hansheng Zhao
    • 1
  • Benhua Fei
    • 1
  • Zehui Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology of the State Forestry AdministrationInternational Centre for Bamboo and RattanBeijingChina
  2. 2.Büsgen-Institute, Department of Forest Botany and Tree PhysiologyGeorg-August University GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  3. 3.Taiping Experimental Station Anhui ProvinceInternational Centre for Bamboo and RattanHuangshan District, Huangshan CityChina

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