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Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 104, Issue 4, pp 475–479 | Cite as

Normative Data for Lean Mass Using FNIH Criteria in an Australian Setting

  • Julie A. PascoEmail author
  • Kara L. Holloway-Kew
  • Monica C. Tembo
  • Sophia X. Sui
  • Kara B. Anderson
  • Pamela Rufus-Membere
  • Natalie K. Hyde
  • Lana J. Williams
  • Mark A. Kotowicz
Case Reports

Abstract

Recommendations from the FNIH Sarcopenia Project are that appendicular lean mass (ALM, kg) adjusted for body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) be used for identifying low lean mass, with ALM/BMI cutpoints of < 0.789 m2 for men and < 0.512 m2 for women. We report normative ALM/BMI values for Australian adults, and compare the performance of cutpoints derived from reference values for this population with FNIH values for identifying low lean mass. Body composition was measured by DXA (Lunar) for 1411 men and 960 women, aged 20–93 years, from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, a population-based study in Australia. Sex-stratified means and standard deviations for DXA-derived ALM/BMI were generated for each age-decade, and cutpoints equivalent to T-scores of − 2.0 were derived using reference data for 374 men and 308 women aged 20–39 years. Mean ALM/BMI values were greater for men than women, and decreased with age in both sexes. Cutpoints for ALM/BMI corresponding to T-scores of − 2.0 were 0.827 m2 for men and 0.518 m2 for women. For individuals aged 65+ years, cross-classification of low lean mass according to FNIH criteria (ALM/BMI < 0.789 m2 men and < 0.512 m2 women) in comparison with our cutpoints for ALM/BMI showed overall agreement of 94.6% for men and 99.0% for women (κ 0.73 and 0.89, respectively). We report good agreement for low ALM indexed to BMI, particularly for women, between classifications based on recommendations from the FNIH Sarcopenia Project for identifying clinically significant weakness, with low values identified within our population distribution of ALM/BMI.

Keywords

Appendicular lean mass Body composition Muscle mass Sarcopenia Reference data 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the men and women who participated in the study.

Funding

The Geelong Osteoporosis Study (GOS) was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Australia (Projects 299831, 251638, 628582). The funding organisations played no role in the design or conduct of the study, in the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data, nor in the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript. SXS, MCT and PGR were supported by Deakin Postgraduate Scholarships and KLH-K was supported by an Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Julie A. Pasco, Kara L. Holloway-Kew, Monica C. Tembo, Sophia X. Sui, Kara B. Anderson, Pamela Rufus-Membere, Natalie K. Hyde, Lana J. Williams, Mark A. Kotowicz have declared that no competing interests exist.

Ethical Approval

The study was approved by Barwon Health’s Human Research Ethics Committee.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and national research committees and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie A. Pasco
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    Email author
  • Kara L. Holloway-Kew
    • 1
  • Monica C. Tembo
    • 1
  • Sophia X. Sui
    • 1
  • Kara B. Anderson
    • 1
  • Pamela Rufus-Membere
    • 1
  • Natalie K. Hyde
    • 1
  • Lana J. Williams
    • 1
  • Mark A. Kotowicz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Deakin UniversityGeelongAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Medicine – Western HealthThe University of MelbourneSt AlbansAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive MedicineMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.Barwon HealthGeelongAustralia
  5. 5.Epi-Centre for Healthy Ageing, IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of MedicineDeakin UniversityGeelongAustralia

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