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Simultaneous metabolic mapping of different anatomies by 1H HR-MAS chemical shift imaging

  • Alan WongEmail author
  • Covadonga Lucas-Torres
Research Paper

Abstract

Localized information on a specimen is considered indispensable for deciphering biological activity. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a notable method because of its versatility; however, one limitation is the spectral quality on a static sample. This study explores an amalgamated method with two magnetic resonance experiments: high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) for high-quality spectral acquisition from a spinning sample and chemical shift imaging (CSI) for spatial localization. The advantage of HR-MAS CSI is its amenity for simultaneously profiling the metabolome—with good spectral data—at different spatial regions in a single experiment. Herein, 1H HR-MAS CSI (including a T2-contrast CSI) was described and performed on various food tissues and an intact organism. Different data analyses such as multivariate and quantification were explored to identify the metabolic variants in different anatomical regions and in one case, to assist in a spatial allocation. The limitation and drawback of the experiment are also discussed.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Metabolomics HR-MAS NMR Chemical shift imaging CSI Localized metabolic profiling Metabolic mapping 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Dr. Franck Fayon and his team (Orleans, France) for their initial assistance on the experimental setup and also to Dr. Gaspard Huber (CEA-Saclay, France) for the discussions and reviewing the manuscript.

Funding

This work was financially supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherché (ANR-16-CE11-0023-01 and ANR-12-JSV5-0005-01).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

216_2019_1603_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.1 mb)
ESM 1 (PDF 1138 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, CEA SaclayUniversité Paris-SaclayGif-sur-YvetteFrance

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