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Pterostilbene, an active component of the dragon’s blood extract, acts as an antidepressant in adult rats

  • Liang Yang
  • Yuanyuan Ran
  • Zhenzhen Quan
  • Ran Wang
  • Qinghu Yang
  • Qiutian Jia
  • Heao Zhang
  • Yanhui Li
  • Yiheng Peng
  • JianHua Liang
  • Hui Wang
  • Hiroshi Nakanishi
  • Yulin DengEmail author
  • Hong QingEmail author
Original Investigation
  • 66 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Hippocampal neurogenesis has been widely considered as one of the potential biological mechanisms for the treatment of depression caused by chronic stress. Many natural products have been reported to be beneficial for neurogenesis.

Objectives

The present study is designed to investigate the effect of dragon’s blood extract (DBE) and its biologically active compound, pterostilbene (PTE), on hippocampal neurogenesis.

Methods

The male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in this study, which were maintained on the normal, DBE and PTE diet groups for 4 weeks before dissection in the normal rat model and behavioral testing in the CUS depression rat model. Meanwhile, DMI-treated rats are subcutaneously injected with DMI (10 mg/kg, i.p.).

Results

Results revealed that DBE and PTE have the ability to promote hippocampal neurogenesis. DBE and PTE also promoted the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from the brain of suckling rats. Oral administration of DBE and PTE induced the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in chronic unexpected stressed (CUS) model rats, and improved the behavioral ability and alleviated depress-like symptoms of CUS rats. It was also observed that PTE treatment significantly induced the expression of neurogenesis-related factors, including BDNF, pERK, and pCREB.

Conclusion

Oral administration of PTE could affect neurogenesis and it is likely to be achieved via BDNF/ERK/CREB-associated signaling pathways.

Keywords

Dragon’s blood extract Pterostilbene Depression Hippocampus Neurogenesis 

Notes

Author contributions

YR, LY, QJ, HZ, YL, and YP performed the experiments; YR, LY, ZQ, and QY analyzed the data and prepared the draft; RW, HW, JL, and HN helped for data analyses; YD and HQ designed the experiments; ZQ and HQ approved the final version.

Funding information

This work was financially supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China (No. 2013YQ03059514) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC 81671268, NSFC 81701260).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

213_2018_5138_MOESM1_ESM.docx (464 kb)
Fig. S1 (DOCX 464 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liang Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuanyuan Ran
    • 1
    • 3
  • Zhenzhen Quan
    • 1
  • Ran Wang
    • 1
  • Qinghu Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qiutian Jia
    • 1
  • Heao Zhang
    • 1
  • Yanhui Li
    • 1
  • Yiheng Peng
    • 1
  • JianHua Liang
    • 1
  • Hui Wang
    • 4
  • Hiroshi Nakanishi
    • 5
  • Yulin Deng
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hong Qing
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Life ScienceBeijing Institute of TechnologyBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.College of Life Sciences & Research Center for Resource Peptide Drugs, Shaanxi Engineering & Technological Research Center for Conversation & Utilization of Regional Biological ResourcesYanan UniversityYananPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Central Laboratory, BeijingLuhe HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Biomedical SchoolBeijing City UniversityBeijingChina
  5. 5.Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental ScienceKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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