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Pharmacokinetic behaviors of ligustrazine after single- and multiple-dose intravenous Shenxiong glucose injection in rats by high-performance liquid chromatography

  • Qiong Wang
  • Huaping Sun
  • Li Yu
  • Xianpeng Ma
  • Baoping Jiang
  • Changqiong Bi
  • Zhihua Wang
  • Qinghong Fan
  • Yuan Yu
  • Yueheng Liu
  • Hong NieEmail author
Original Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Shenxiong glucose injection (SXG) is a traditional Chinese medicine that is used for cardio-cerebral vascular diseases on the national essential drug list of China. To date, a comprehensive knowledge concerning the pharmacokinetic profile of SXG-related components, especially following multiple dosing, is still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ligustrazine after single- and multiple-dose intravenous administration of SXG in rats. A simple HPLC method was developed for the determination of ligustrazine in biological samples. The pharmacokinetic profiles of ligustrazine in rats were linear after both single- and multiple-dose intravenous administration of SXG, with a half-life of approximately 35 min. Ligustrazine was readily distributed in highly perfused organs and almost eliminated from organs after 90 min of SXG injection. The AUC0-t and C0 of ligustrazine after SXG injection (18 ml/kg, equal to 9.0 mg/kg ligustrazine) were increased significantly compared to those of single ligustrazine administration (9.0 mg/kg), indicating that the pharmacokinetics of ligustrazine in the SXG were affected by other ingredients. This study provided first evidence for the pharmacokinetic characteristics of ligustrazine after both single and multiple-dose SXG in rats, which would be helpful for its clinical application.

Keywords

Shenxiong glucose injection (SXG) Ligustrazine Pharmacokinetics Tissue distribution 

Notes

Author contributions

Hong Nie, Qiong Wang, and Li Yu conceived and designed research. Qiong Wang, Huaping Sun, Li Yu, and Baoping Jiang conducted experiments. Qiong Wang, Huaping Sun, Xianpeng Ma, Changqiong Bi, and Yueheng Liu analyzed data. Qiong Wang, Hong Nie, Zhihua Wang, Qinghong Fan, and Yuan Yu wrote the manuscript. All authors read and approved the manuscript.

Funding

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81673634) and the Peak Talent Foundation of Jiangsu Province Hospital of Chinese Medicine (y2014rc18, y2018rc20).

Compliance with ethical standards

Animal welfare and experimental procedures were strictly performed in accordance with the Guidelines for Animal Experimentation of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine (Nanjing, China) and were in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiong Wang
    • 1
  • Huaping Sun
    • 2
  • Li Yu
    • 3
  • Xianpeng Ma
    • 4
  • Baoping Jiang
    • 3
  • Changqiong Bi
    • 4
  • Zhihua Wang
    • 5
  • Qinghong Fan
    • 5
  • Yuan Yu
    • 4
  • Yueheng Liu
    • 3
  • Hong Nie
    • 5
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyAffiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese MedicineNanjingChina
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyAffiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese MedicineNanjingChina
  3. 3.College of PharmacyNanjing University of Chinese MedicineNanjingChina
  4. 4.Guizhou Jingfeng Injection Co. LtdGuiyangChina
  5. 5.Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of TCM and New Drugs Research, College of PharmacyJinan UniversityGuangzhouChina

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