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International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 219–229 | Cite as

Effects of vaginal tampon training added to pelvic floor muscle training in women with stress urinary incontinence: randomized controlled trial

  • Ceren OrhanEmail author
  • Türkan Akbayrak
  • Serap Özgül
  • Emine Baran
  • Esra Üzelpasaci
  • Gülbala Nakip
  • Nejat Özgül
  • Mehmet Sinan Beksaç
Original Article
  • 320 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis

We evaluated whether vaginal tampon training (VTT) combined with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) results in better outcomes than PFMT alone for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Methods

This was a randomized, controlled study. Patients were allocated to either the combined program, consisting of PFMT and VTT over 12 weeks [PFMT and VTT group (n = 24)] or to PFMT alone [PFMT group (n = 24)]. The primary outcome measure was self-reported improvement, while secondary outcome measures were severity of incontinence, quality of life (QoL), urinary parameters, and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) and endurance (PFME). Values were analyzed with Friedman, Mann–Whitney U, Wilcoxon, and chi-square tests.

Results

Between-group analysis showed no statistically significant differences in self-reported improvement, severity of incontinence, symptom distress score, PFMS, PFME, urinary parameters, and all domains of QoL scores, except social limitations, at weeks 4, 8, and 12 (p > 0.05). However, the increase in PFMS and PFME between baseline and week 12 and earlier improvement was significantly greater in the PFMT and VTT than in the PFMT group (both p < 0.05)

Conclusion

Short-term results demonstrated that PFMT with and without VT exercises had similar effectiveness on the symptoms of SUI and QoL.

Keywords

Stress urinary incontinence Pelvic floor Exercise Randomized controlled trial 

Abbreviations

BMI

Body mass index

ICS

International Continence Society

KHQ

King’s Health Questionnaire

MESA

Medical, Epidemiologic, and Social Aspects of Aging

PFME

Pelvic floor muscle endurance

PFMS

Pelvic floor muscle strength

PFMT

Pelvic floor muscle training

RCT

Randomized controlled trial

SUI

Stress urinary incontinence

UI

Urinary incontinence

V10s

Value at the end of 10 s

Vmax

Maximum value

Vrest

Rest value

VAS

Visual analog scale

VTT

Vaginal tampon training

Notes

Acknowledgements

We express our sincere thanks to Deniz Yüce, MD for his assistance with the statistical analyses.

Funding

The first author received a scholarship from The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey during her PhD education.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© The International Urogynecological Association 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy and RehabilitationHacettepe UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyHacettepe UniversityAnkaraTurkey

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