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Modeling and simulation of magnetic abrasive finishing process

  • S.C. Jayswal
  • V.K. JainEmail author
  • P.M. Dixit
Original Article

Abstract

Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) is one of the advanced finishing processes, which produces a high level of surface quality and is primarily controlled by a magnetic field. In MAF, the workpiece is kept between the two poles of a magnet. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with magnetic abrasive particles. A magnetic abrasive flexible brush (MAFB) is formed, acting as a multipoint cutting tool, due to the effect of the magnetic field in the working gap. This paper deals with the theoretical investigations of the MAF process. A finite element model of the process is developed to evaluate the distribution of magnetic forces on the workpiece surface. The MAF process removes a very small amount of material by indentation and rotation of magnetic abrasive particles in the circular tracks. A theoretical model for material removal and surface roughness is also proposed accounting for microcutting by considering a uniform surface profile without statistical distribution. Numerical experiments are carried out by providing different routes of intermittent motion to the tool. The simulation results are verified by comparing them with the experimental results available in the literature.

Keywords

FEM Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF)  Modeling Nanometer (nm) finish  Non-conventional finishing Simulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology KanpurKanpurIndia

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