Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

Parental disruption and the labour market performance of children when they reach adulthood

  • 164 Accesses

  • 19 Citations

Abstract.

This paper uses data from the age 33 wave of the British National Child Development Survey (NCDS) to analyze the effects of a parental disruption (divorce or death of a father) on the labour market performance of children when they reach adulthood. The NCDS is a longitudinal study of all children born during the first week of March 1958 in England, Scotland, and Wales. Controlling for a rich set of pre-disruption characteristics, the results indicate that a parental disruption leads to moderately less employment among males and considerably lower wage rates among females at age 33. If pre-disruption characteristics are not controlled for, larger effects are estimated for both males and females. Parental disruption also seems to cause substantial reductions in educational attainment for both males and females.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Author information

Additional information

Received: 22 May 1998/Accepted: 27 April 1999

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Fronstin, P., Greenberg, D. & Robins, P. Parental disruption and the labour market performance of children when they reach adulthood. J Popul Econ 14, 137–172 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/s001480050163

Download citation

  • JEL classification: J12
  • J22
  • J24
  • Key words: Marital disruptions
  • labour supply
  • educational attainment
  • wage rates