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Allelopathic Effects on Microcystis aeruginosa and Allelochemical Identification in the Cuture Solutions of Typical Artificial Floating-Bed Plants

  • Li Zhou
  • Guifa Chen
  • Naxin Cui
  • Qi Pan
  • Xiangfu Song
  • Guoyan ZouEmail author
Article
  • 84 Downloads

Abstract

Cyperus alternifolius (C. alternifolius) and Canna generalis (C. generalis) are widely used as artificial floating-bed (AFB) plants for water pollution control. This study evaluated the release of anti-cyanobacterial allelochemicals from both plants in AFB systems. A series of cyanobacterial assays using pure culture solutions and extracts of culture solutions of C. alternifolius and C. generalis demonstrated allelopathic growth inhibition of a cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa. After 45 days of incubation by the culture solutions, both final inhibitory rates of M. aeruginosa were more than 99.6% compared with that of the control groups. GC/MS analyses indicated the presence of a total of 15 kinds of compounds, including fatty acids and phenolic compounds, in both plants’ culture solutions, which are are anti-cyanobacterial. These findings provide a basis to apply artificial floating-bed plants for cyanobacterial inhibition using allelopathic effects.

Keywords

Allelopathy Cyperus alternifolius Canna generalis Microcystis aeruginosa Allelochemicals 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Chinese Ministry of Construction Foundation for Major Special projects of Water Pollution Control and Management of Science & Technology (Grant No. 2017ZX07202004-004) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 20477028) for financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guifa Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Naxin Cui
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qi Pan
    • 1
  • Xiangfu Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guoyan Zou
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Eco-Environmental Protection Research InstituteShanghai Academy of Agricultural SciencesShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Shanghai Engineering Research Centre of Low-carbon AgricultureShanghaiChina

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