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Perfluoroalkyl Substances in Daling River Adjacent to Fluorine Industrial Parks: Implication from Industrial Emission

  • Jing Meng
  • Tieyu WangEmail author
  • Pei Wang
  • Zhaoyun Zhu
  • Qifeng Li
  • Yonglong Lu
Article

Abstract

The pollution level and source of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in mainstream and tributary of Daling River in northeast China were investigated in present study. Concentrations of PFASs in surface water and sediment ranged from 4.6 to 3,410 ng/L and from 0.08 to 2.6 ng/g dry weight, respectively. The lowest levels of PFASs were found in vicinity of a drinking water source located in upstream of Daling River. Xihe tributary, which is adjacent to two local fluorine industrial parks, contained the highest level of PFASs. Short-chain PFASs, including perfluorobutanoic acid and perfluorobutane sulfonate, were of higher levels due to their emerging as alternative products for perfluorooctane sulfonate. High level of perfluorooctanoic acid was also found in Daling River. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the relatively severe pollutions of Xihe tributary were caused by long-term development of the two local fluorine industry parks.

Keywords

PFASs Historical deposition Sediment core Partition Fluorine industrial park 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 41171394 and 41371488, and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No. KZZD-EW-TZ-12.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Meng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tieyu Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pei Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhaoyun Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qifeng Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yonglong Lu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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