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The use of microsatellites for detecting DNA polymorphism, genotype identification and genetic diversity in wheat

Abstract 

A set of 20 wheat microsatellite markers was used with 55 elite wheat genotypes to examine their utility (1) in detecting DNA polymorphism, (2)in the identifying genotypes and (3) in estimating genetic diversity among wheat genotypes. The 55 elite genotypes of wheat used in this study originated in 29 countries representing six continents. A total of 155 alleles were detected at 21 loci using the above microsatellite primer pairs (only 1 primer amplified 2 loci; all other primers amplified 1 locus each). Of the 20 primers amplifying 21 loci, 17 primers and their corresponding 18 loci were assigned to 13 different chromosomes (6 chromosomes of the A genome, 5 chromosomes of the B genome and 2 chromosomes of the D genome). The number of alleles per locus ranged from 1 to 13, with an average of 7.4 alleles per locus. The values of average polymorphic information content (PIC) and the marker index (MI) for these markers were estimated to be 0.71 and 0.70, respectively. The (GT)n microsatellites were found to be the most polymorphic. The genetic similarity (GS) coefficient for all possible 1485 pairs of genotypes ranged from 0.05 to 0.88 with an average of 0.23. The dendrogram, prepared on the basis of similarity matrix using the UPGMA algorithm, delineated the above genotypes into two major clusters (I and II), each with two subclusters (Ia, Ib and IIa, IIb). One of these subclusters (Ib) consisted of a solitary genotype (E3111) from Portugal, so that it was unique and diverse with respect to all other genotypes belonging to cluster I and placed in subcluster Ia. Using a set of only 12 primer pairs, we were able to distinguish a maximum of 48 of the above 55 wheat genotypes. The results demonstrate the utility of microsatellite markers for detecting polymorphism leading to genotype identification and for estimating genetic diversity.

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Received: 15 May 1999 / Accepted: 27 July 1999

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Prasad, M., Varshney, R., Roy, J. et al. The use of microsatellites for detecting DNA polymorphism, genotype identification and genetic diversity in wheat. Theor Appl Genet 100, 584–592 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/s001220050077

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  • Key words Microsatellite markers
  • Wheat
  • Genetic diversity
  • Genotype identification