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Pure and Applied Geophysics

, Volume 176, Issue 4, pp 1379–1395 | Cite as

The September 28th, 2018, Tsunami In Palu-Sulawesi, Indonesia: A Post-Event Field Survey

  • R. OmiraEmail author
  • G. G. Dogan
  • R. Hidayat
  • S. Husrin
  • G. Prasetya
  • A. Annunziato
  • C. Proietti
  • P. Probst
  • M. A. Paparo
  • M. Wronna
  • A. Zaytsev
  • P. Pronin
  • A. Giniyatullin
  • P. S. Putra
  • D. Hartanto
  • G. Ginanjar
  • W. Kongko
  • E. Pelinovsky
  • A. C. Yalciner
Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Sulawesi/Palu-2018 and Anak/Krakatau-2018

Abstract

On September 28th, 2018, a powerful earthquake (Mw 7.5) struck the Island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. The earthquake was followed by a destructive and deadly tsunami that hit the Bay of Palu. A UNESCO international tsunami survey team responded to the disaster and surveyed 125 km of coastline along the Palu Bay up to the earthquake epicentre region. The team performed 78 tsunami runup and inundation height measurements throughout the surveyed coastline. Measured values reached 9.1 m for the runup height and 8.7 m for the inundation height, both at Benteng village. The survey team also identified ten large coastal sectors that collapsed into the sea of Palu Bay after the earthquake. The distribution of the measured tsunami data within Palu Bay exhibits a clear localised impact suggesting the contribution of secondary non-seismic local sources to the generation of the tsunami. Findings of the field reconnaissance are discussed to provide an insight into the remaining debated source of the Palu tsunami.

Keywords

Tsunami runup height inundation height coastal damage landslides Palu-Sulawesi Indonesia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors thank Indonesian authorities BMKG, BPPT, MORTHE, CMMA, MMAF, LIPI, IATsI. The authors acknowledge all supporters of the survey: METU, Yuksel Project International Co., Turkish Chamber of Civil Engineers, Turkey; Prof. Stefano Tinti from Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Italy; Prof. Maria Ana Baptista from University of Lisbon; European Commission Joint Research Centre (EC JRC), Disaster and Risk Management Unit Ispra, Italy; Portuguese Institute for Sea and Atmosphere, Lisbon, Dom Luiz Institute, Faculty of science, University of Lisbon, Portugal; Special Research Bureau for Automation of Marine Researches, and Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University n.a. R.E. Alekseev, Russia; Austrian Embassy in Jakarta; Fundação para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), Kneissl Touristik GmbH, FCT funded project MAGICLAND (PTDC/CTA-GEO/30381/2017); RF Ministry of Science and Higher Education (project No. 5.5176.2017/8.9); RF President program (project No. NSH- 2685.2018.5) and RFBR (project No. 18-05-80019). Furthermore, we acknowledge the excellent cooperation of Laura Kong from UNESCO ITIC and Ardito Kodijat from UNESCO IOTIC and the onsite contributions thankfully.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Omira
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • G. G. Dogan
    • 3
  • R. Hidayat
    • 4
  • S. Husrin
    • 5
  • G. Prasetya
    • 6
  • A. Annunziato
    • 7
  • C. Proietti
    • 7
  • P. Probst
    • 7
  • M. A. Paparo
    • 8
  • M. Wronna
    • 2
  • A. Zaytsev
    • 9
  • P. Pronin
    • 10
  • A. Giniyatullin
    • 10
  • P. S. Putra
    • 11
  • D. Hartanto
    • 12
  • G. Ginanjar
    • 12
  • W. Kongko
    • 13
  • E. Pelinovsky
    • 14
  • A. C. Yalciner
    • 3
  1. 1.Portuguese Institute for Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA)LisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Dom Luiz Institute (IDL), Faculty of SciencesUniversity of LisbonLisbonPortugal
  3. 3.Department of Civil Engineering, Ocean Engineering Research CenterMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  4. 4.Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs (CMMA-RI)JakartaIndonesia
  5. 5.Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF-RI)JakartaIndonesia
  6. 6.Indonesian Tsunami Scientific Community (IATsI)JakartaIndonesia
  7. 7.Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Ispra SiteIspraItaly
  8. 8.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  9. 9.Special Research Bureau for Automation of Marine ResearchesNizhny NovgorodRussia
  10. 10.Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University n.a. R.E. AlekseevNizhny NovgorodRussia
  11. 11.Indonesian Institute of Science (LIPI)JakartaIndonesia
  12. 12.Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysical Agency (BMKG)JakartaIndonesia
  13. 13.Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT)JakartaIndonesia
  14. 14.Institute of Applied PhysicsNizhny NovgorodRussia

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