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Local Content Policy in the Australian Television Industry

  • Elizabeth Manning
Article

Abstract

This paper examines the impact and effectiveness of the local content scheme currently operating in the Australian Television industry. It finds the scheme has questionable success in meeting its stated objectives of promoting Australian culture and allowing for a diversity of views, and that the economic costs of the scheme are difficult to gauge. Further, concentrated media power (in part arising from local content requirements) has influenced government decisions regarding implementation of digital technology in ways that have worked against public interest objectives of diversity in programming. Finally, rapidly changing technology means local content is only mandated on some broadcasting platforms, further reducing the effectiveness of the scheme.

Key words

television protection culture diversity local content 

JEL Classification

F13 

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References

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Copyright information

© Japan Economic Policy Association (JEPA) 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Deakin UniversityWaurn PondsAustralia

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