Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

Sevoflurane exposure time and the neuromuscular blocking effect of vecuronium

  • 304 Accesses

  • 13 Citations

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the effect of sevoflurane exposure time on the duration of vecuronium neuromuscular blockade.

Methods

In 40 adult patients anesthesia was induced with 1.5–2 mg·kg−1 propofol and 3–5 μg·kg−1 fentanyl and the trachea was intubated without the aid of muscle relaxant. Patients were randomized into four groups of 10. In group 1, 0.05 mg·kg−1 vecuronium was administered with N2O and anesthesia was maintained by propofol infusion and fentanyl. Vecuronium was administered with sevoflurane 2% in 30 patients, commencing at the same time (group 2) and at 30, and 60 min after sevoflurane (groups 3, 4). Adductor pollicis force of contraction to train-of-four ulnar nerve stimulation was recorded. Times from vecuronium injection to 95%, maximal block, and recovery times to 25% recovery were recorded.

Results

There were no differences in times to 95% and maximal block in the four groups. Recovery times were longer in groups 3 and 4 than in groups 2 and 1 (P < 0.01). Times to 5% recovery were 15.0 ± 3.7, 17.8 ± 4.8, 28.2 ± 9.9, and 29.5 ± 9.5, and to 25% recovery were 22.3 ± 5.2, 27.2 ± 6.4, 42.3 ± 16.3, and 50.5 ± 16.4 in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. No differences were found between group 1 and group 2 nor between group 3 and group 4.

Conclusion

Sevoflurane produced time-dependent potentiation of vecuronium. After 30 min exposure, 25% recovery was prolonged by 89% and after 60 min by more than 100% compared with the control group.

Objectif

Déterminer l’effet du temps d’exposition au sévoflurane sur la durée du blocage neuromusculaire avec du vécuronium.

Méthode

On a induit l’anesthésie avec 1,5–2 mg·kg−1 de propofol et 3–5 μg·kg−1 de fentanyl chez 40 patients adultes et on a procédé à l’intubation endotrachéale sans myorelaxant. Les patients ont été répartis en quatre groupes de 10. Dans le groupe 1, on a administré 0,05 mg·kg−1 de vécuronium avec N2O et on a maintenu l’anesthésie avec une perfusion de propofol et de fentanyl. Chez 30 patients, le vécuronium a été administré avec le sévoflurane 2 %, en même temps aux patients du groupe 2, mais 30 et 60 min après le sévoflurane à ceux des groupes 3 et 4. La force de contraction de l’adducteur du pouce à la stimulation en train-de-quatre du nerf cubital a été notée. Le temps nécessaire pour que le vécuronium injecté produise 95 % du bloc, puis le bloc maximal, et le temps nécessaire pour atteindre une récupération de 25 %, ont été enregistrés.

Résultats

II n’y a pas eu de différence de temps intergroupe pour produire 95 % du bloc, ni pour le bloc maximal. La récupération s’est prolongée dans les groupes 3 et 4 comparés aux groupes 2 et 1 (P < 0,01). Le temps nécessaire pour atteindre une récupération de 5 % ont été de 15,0 ± 3,7, 17,8 ± 4,8, 28,2 ± 9,9, et de 29,5 ± 9,5, et pour une récupération de 25 % ont été de 22,3 ± 5,2, 27,2 ± 6,4, 42,3 ± 16,3, et de 50,5 ± 16,4 dans les groupes 1, 2, 3, et 4 respectivement. Aucune différence n’a été rapportée entre les groupes 1 et 2, ni entre les groupes 3 et 4.

Conclusion

Le sévoflurane a produit une potentialisation du vécuronium dépendante du temps. Après 30 min d’exposition le temps nécessaire pour produire une récupération de 25 % s’est accru de 89 % et, après 60 min, de plus de 100 %, si on le compare au temps du groupe témoin.

References

  1. 1

    Swen J, Rashkovsky OM, Ket JM, Koot HWJ, Hermans J, Agoston S. Interaction between nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and inhalational anesthetics. Anesth Analg 1989; 69: 752–5.

  2. 2

    Miller RD, Way WL, Dolan WM, Stevens WC, Eger EI II. Comparative neuromuscular effects of pancuronium, gallamine, and succinylcholine during forane and halothane anesthesia in man. Anesthesiology 1971; 35: 509–14.

  3. 3

    Cannon JE, Fahey MR, Castagnoli KP, et al. Continuous infusion of vecuronium. The effect of anesthetic agents. Anesthesiology 1987; 67: 503–6.

  4. 4

    Walts LF, Dillon JB. The influence of the anesthetic agent on the action of curare in man. Anesth Analg 1970; 49: 17–20.

  5. 5

    Rupp SM, Miller RD, Gencarelli PJ. Vecuroniuminduced neuromuscular blockade during enflurane, isoflurane, and halothane anesthesia in humans. Anesthesiology 1984; 60: 102–5.

  6. 6

    Aziz L, Ohta Y, Nakatsuka H, Takata F, Morita K, Hirakawa M. Effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the potencies of muscle relaxants in ratin vivo. Anesth Analg 1995; 80: S26.

  7. 7

    Gencarelli PJ, Miller RD, Eger EI II, Newfield P. Decreasing enflurane concentrations and d-tubucurarine neuromuscular blockade. Anesthesiology 1982; 56: 192–1.

  8. 8

    Stanski DR, Ham J, Miller RD, Sheiner LB. Time-dependent increase in sensitivity to d-tubocurarine during enflurane anesthesia in man. Anesthiesiology 1980; 52: 483–7.

  9. 9

    Withington DE, Donati F, Bevan DR, Varin F. Potentiation of atracurium neuromuscular blockade by enflurane: time-course of effect. Anesth Analg 1991; 72: 469–73.

  10. 10

    Meretoja OA, Wirtavuori K, Taivainen T, Olkkola KT. Time course of potentiation of mivacurium by halothane and isoflurane in children. Br J Anaesth 1996; 76: 235–8.

  11. 11

    Jalkanen L, Meretoja OA. The influence of the duration of isoflurane anaesthesia on neuromuscular effects of mivacurium. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 1997; 41: 248–51.

  12. 12

    Eger EI II. Anesthetic Uptake and Action. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Company, 1974.

  13. 13

    Tasuda N, Targ AG, Eger EI II. Solubility of I-653, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane in human tissues. Anesth Analg 1989; 69: 370–3.

  14. 14

    Ali HH, Savarese JJ. Monitoring of neuromuscular function. Anesthesiology 1976; 45: 216–49.

  15. 15

    Morita T, Tsukagoshi H, Sugaya T, Yoshikawa D, Fujita T. The effects of sevoflurane are similar to those of isoflurane on the neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium. Br J Anaesth 1994; 72: 465–7.

  16. 16

    Kurahaski K, Matruta H. The effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane on the neuromuscular block produced by vecuronium continuous infusion. Anesth Analg 1996; 82: 942–7.

  17. 17

    Eger EI II. Isoflurane: a review. Anesthesiology 1981; 55: 559–76.

Download references

Author information

Correspondence to Ashraf Abdel Kader Ahmed.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Ahmed, A.A.K., Kumagai, M., Otake, T. et al. Sevoflurane exposure time and the neuromuscular blocking effect of vecuronium. Can J Anesth 46, 429–432 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03012941

Download citation

Keywords

  • Sevoflurane
  • Vecuronium
  • Enflurane
  • Atracurium
  • Neuromuscular Block