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Some observations on allergy of the respiratory tract

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Conclusions

1. Allergy may occur in any or all areas of the respiratory tract from the nares to and including the lungs.

2. Such allergic disturbances may occur in patients of any age.

3. Individual areas in the respiratory tract may be affected by allergenci disurbances at the same time that other systems of the body are similarly affected.

4. Pharyngeal and nasopharyngeal conditions are especially likely so to occur.

5. There is evidence that hereditary predisposition plays a definite part in such disturbances.

6. Such hereditary predisposition does not necessarily appear s familial occurrence of the same condition; merely the tendency tosome sort of allergenic disturbance seems to be what is inheritable.

7. In some allergy patients, adrenalin may cause serious illness.

8. Elimination of irritating inhalants and of allergenic foods from the diet, together with removal of any foci of infection, will relieve the symptoms of suffering from respiratory allergies.

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Turnbull, J.A. Some observations on allergy of the respiratory tract. A. J. D. D. 16, 132–139 (1949). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03001602

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Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Mucous Membrane
  • Allergenic Food
  • Middle Turbinate
  • Laryngitis