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Failure of radioiodine treatment in Graves’ disease intentionally caused by a patient: Suspected Munchausen syndrome

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Abstract

We experienced a case with Graves’ disease in which radioiodine treatment failed probably because of intentional spitting out of capsules of radioactive iodide. Chemical analysis of the substances collected from the trash in the treatment room demonstrated that its profile was the same as that of the capsules for radioiodine administration. Measurement of the iodine concentrations in a blood sample obtained at 24 h after the administration of radioiodine indicated that the patient showed iodine excess. These findings suggest that this may be a case of Munchausen syndrome.

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References

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Author information

Correspondence to Seigo Kinuya or Takatoshi Michigishi or Kenichi Nakajima or Keiko Kinuya or Akira Seto or Ichiei Kuji or Kunihiko Yokoyama or Norihisa Tonami.

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Kinuya, S., Michigishi, T., Nakajima, K. et al. Failure of radioiodine treatment in Graves’ disease intentionally caused by a patient: Suspected Munchausen syndrome. Ann Nucl Med 18, 631–632 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02984587

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Key words

  • Graves’ disease
  • 131I
  • treatment failure
  • Munchausen syndrome