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Genetical studies on the skeleton of the mouse XX. Maternal physiology and variation in the skeleton of C57 BL mice

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Summary

  1. 1.

    The effect of oats, wheat, buckwheat and barley on the skeleton of offspring from. parents fed on these diets has been analysed, and the results correlated with the effect on birth weight and weight at 21 days.

  2. 2.

    In nineteen out of twenty-two characters Searle’s and our own experiments with oats were in agreement.

  3. 3.

    All four diets had a similar effect on the skeleton in the majority of cases. In general oats had the least deleterious effect on the mice, but its effect on the skeleton was the strongest. Barley is by far the poorest diet, but has a comparatively small effect on the skeleton.

  4. 4.

    The characters used are quasi-continuous and in about ten variants a reduction in the size of the animals is the underlying cause of the changes produced by the deficient diets.

  5. 5.

    Five new variants are also described for the first time.

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References

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Correspondence to M. S. Deol or Gillian M. Truslove.

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Deol, M.S., Truslove, G.M. Genetical studies on the skeleton of the mouse XX. Maternal physiology and variation in the skeleton of C57 BL mice. J Genet 55, 288 (1957). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02981645

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Keywords

  • Birth Weight
  • Dorsal View
  • Deficient Diet
  • Posterior Border
  • Wheat Diet