Practical Failure Analysis

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 14–19 | Cite as

Conducting the failure examination

  • George F. Vander Voort
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Conclusion

Performing failure analyses is an exceptionally challenging and exciting job. The investigator must have a sound background in the areas that are central to testing and analytical work and must also be knowledgeable enough to know when to call on other fields of specialization that interface with the work. New problems are always encountered that tax the ingenuity of the investigator, and they will sharpen and expand ones skills if we are willing to go on learning. By the same token, analysis of failures by many investigators in the ferrous and nonferrous metal industries here and abroad has, over the years, expanded the practical knowledge for processing and product developments and also contributed to basic scientific insights.

Those who frequently conduct failure examinations agree on several main points. Most failures could easily be prevented if certain well-documented precautions are taken. Many failures occur as a result of fatigue, and one or more of the following may play a decisive role: original design deficiencies, material inadequacies, machining or fabrication, imperfections, abuse or neglect, improper maintenance, improper repairs, and metallurgical factors such as decarburization. Heat-treatment irregularities are another major contributing factor in failures.

Keywords

Failure Analysis Ferritic Stainless Steel Stainless Steel Wire Fracture Face Friction Bearing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G.F. Vander Voort:ASM Metals Engineering Quarterly, 1975, vol. 15(May), pp. 31–36.Google Scholar
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    ASM Metals Handbook, vol. 9,Fractography and Atlas of Fractographs, 8th ed., American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1974.Google Scholar
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    ASM Metals Handbook, vol. 10,Failure Analysis and Prevention, 8th ed., American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1975.Google Scholar
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    ASM Metals Handbook, vol. 11,Failure Analysis and Prevention, 9th ed., American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1986.Google Scholar
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    ASM Metals Handbook, vol. 12,Fractography, 9th ed., American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1987.Google Scholar
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    G.F. Vander Voort: inASM Metals Handbook, vol. 11,Failure Analysis and Prevention, 9th ed., American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1986, pp. 715–727.Google Scholar
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    R. Dean:Advanced Materials & Processes, 2000, vol. 158(3), pp. 42–45.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International - The Materials Information Society 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • George F. Vander Voort
    • 1
  1. 1.Buehler LtdLake Bluff

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