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Pharmaceutisch Weekblad

, Volume 8, Issue 6, pp 289–292 | Cite as

Screening for antimicrobial activity of some essential oils by the agar overlay technique

Statistics and correlations
  • A. M. Janssen
  • N. L. J. Chin
  • J. J. C. Scheffer
  • A. Baerheim Svendsen
Original Articles

Abstract

Fifty-three essential oils were tested against five micro-organisms (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans) using the agar overlay technique. The essential oils were randomly selected and not on the basis of a supposed activity. It was found that all oils showed an activity against at least one micro-organism, and that substantial activities againstP. aeruginosa were scarce. Combined activities againstC. albicans, the Gram-positive bacteria andE. coli, and an activity againstC. albicans were most often observed. Secondly a combined activity againstC. albicans, B. subtilis andS. aureus was found. The differences between the inhibition zones were too small for a differentiation of the antimicrobial activities of the essential oils. A correlation matrix shows the relationships of the micro-organisms as to the activity patterns of the essential oils. High correlations were found for all the micro-organisms, except forP. aeruginosa.

Key words

Agar overlay technique Antibiotics Drug screening Essential oils Statistics 

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Copyright information

© Bohn, Scheltema & Holkema 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Janssen
    • 1
  • N. L. J. Chin
    • 1
  • J. J. C. Scheffer
    • 1
  • A. Baerheim Svendsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pharmacognosy, Center for Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gorlaeus LaboratoriesLeiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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