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Pharmaceutisch Weekblad

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 33–43 | Cite as

Developments in quinolones

Bacteriology, pharmacokinetics and initial clinical experience of several investigational quinolone derivatives
  • R. Janknegt
  • Y. A. Hekster
Review Articles

Abstract

The properties of several new, investigational quinolones are reviewed. Desirable characteristics of new quinolones are improved activity against especially Gram-positive bacteria, longer elimination half-life, slower development of resistance, fewer side effectsetc. Fleroxacin and lomefloxacin have entered phase III trials: their main advantage lies in improved pharmacokinetics. AM-1091, AT-4140 and T-3262 are still in early phases of development and show improved activity against Gram-positive bacteria. They also show a reduced penetration of the blood-brain barrier, probably resulting in fewer side effects in the central nervous system. AM-1091 shows incomplete cross-resistance with ciprofloxacin.

Keywords

Bacteriology Ciprofloxacin Clinical trials Fleroxacin Lomefloxacin Pharmacokinetics Quinolones Temafloxacin 

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Janknegt
    • 1
  • Y. A. Hekster
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PharmacyStichting Ziekenzorg Westelijke MijnstreekMB Sittardthe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Clinical PharmacySt. Radboud HospitalHB Nijmegenthe Netherlands

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