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Pharmaceutisch Weekblad

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 15–21 | Cite as

Analysis of creams

IV. Application of high performance liquid chromatography. Part 1
  • O. A. Lake
  • A. Hulshoff
  • F. J. Van De Vaart
  • A. W. M. Indemans
Original Articles

Abstract

The possibilities of applying reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography to the analysis of o/w emulsion type creams without preceding sample clean-up were investigated. The Chromatographic behaviour of cream base components and active compounds in reversed phase systems consisting of methanol-water mixtures as the mobile phase and a chemically bonded octadecyl stationary phase, was studied. A number of active compounds and the preservative (sorbic acid) could be determined — often in one Chromatographic run — without complications, by simply dissolving the sample in a suitable solvent mixture and injecting an aliquot of the solution into the Chromatograph. Separation was achieved by the proper choice of methanol content, pH and ionic strength of the eluent. The compounds were detected by uv absorption. Some of the lipophilic cream base components could easily be determined in the same manner, with methanol as the eluent and with refraction index detection. The developed procedure was applied to the analysis of a number of creams. Some of the results are presented as examples, demonstrating the suitability of the method for quality control purposes.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Active Compound Solvent Mixture Refraction Index Octadecyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. A. Lake
    • 1
  • A. Hulshoff
    • 1
  • F. J. Van De Vaart
    • 2
  • A. W. M. Indemans
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Laboratory, Department of Analytical PharmacyUniversity of UtrechtGH UtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Laboratory of the Dutch PharmacistsJL 's-GravenhageThe Netherlands

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