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Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 61–66 | Cite as

An overview of pharmacoepidemiology

  • Albert I. Wertheimer
  • Kate B. Andrews
Reviews

Abstract

Pharmacoepidemiology is the application of epidemiological principles and methods to the study of drug effects in human populations. The goal of this discipline is to characterize, control and predict the effects and uses of pharmacological treatment modalities.

Pharmacoepidemiology is also concerned with the economic impact and health benefits of unintended drug effects. The increasing importance of pharmacoepidemiology has been created by the need to develop a more accurate portrait of how drugs are used in the general population. Sophisticated and potent drug carefully controlled clinical trials of Phases I, II and III. Case-control and cohort studies, which allow scientists to evaluate the effects of patient variables on clinical outcomes, provide a wealth of information regarding the study of unexpected drug effects, drug utilization, treatment costs and the individualization of therapy.

Keywords

Clinical trials Data collection Drug utilization Economics, pharmaceutical Epidemiological methods Pharmacoepidemiology Product surveillance, postmarketing Statistics 

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert I. Wertheimer
    • 1
  • Kate B. Andrews
    • 2
  1. 1.Pharmacy Managed CareFirst Health Services CorporationGlen AllenUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineMedical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA

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