Advertisement

Acta neurovegetativa

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 579–588 | Cite as

Comments on Langley's antidromic action on an experimental basis

Part IV. The sympathetic vasodilator fibers via posterior roots for frog's nictitating membrane
  • Kaichi Kotsuka
  • Hiroe Naito
Article

Summary

  1. 1.

    Following stimuli on the posterior spinal roots II, III of frogs there develops a vasodilation in the small arteries of the nictitating membrane.

     
  2. 2.

    It is demonstrated that the vasodilator impulses due to stimuli on the posterior roots II, III enter the sympathetic chain passing through the rami communicantes II, III, not along the ordinary sensory nerve fibers, but via the efferent autonomic nerve fibers in the posterior roots and rami communicantes.

     
  3. 3.

    It is physiologically confirmed that there exist efferent vasodilator fibers for the frog's nictitating membrane in the posterior roots II, III and that the vasodilator fibers have their origin in the posterior quadrant of the spinal cord making cellstation at the spinal ganglia II, III.

     
  4. 4.

    The vasodilation in the nictitating membrane of frogs following stimuli on the posterior roots II, III is not attributable to the Langley's antidromic action of ordinary sensory nerves in the posterior roots.

     
  5. 5.

    It is demonstrated that the blood vessels of the frog's nictitating membrane is subject to “efferent antagonistic sympathetic double innervation” in terms of efferent sympathetic vasodilator fibers via posterior roots and efferent sympathetic vasoconstrictor fibers via anterior roots.

     

Keywords

Nictitate Membrane Posterior Root Sympathetic Vasoconstrictor Posterior Quadrant Rami Communicantes 

Zusammenfassung

  1. 1.

    Nach Reizung der hinteren Wurzeln (HW) II, III, ließ sich beim Frosch eine Dilatation der kleineren Arterien in der Nickhaut nachweisen.

     
  2. 2.

    Die Vasodilatationsimpulse bei Reizung der HW II, III gelangen durch die Rami communicantes II, III in den sympathischen Grenzstrang, und zwar nicht über die sensiblen Fasern der HW, sondern über die efferent-autonomen Nervenfasern in der HW und in den Rami communicantes.

     
  3. 3.

    In den HW II, III des Frosches ziehen efferente vasodilatatorische Fasern zur Nickhaut. Diese Fasern haben im hinteren Quadranten des Rückenmarkes ihren Ursprung und in den Spinalganglien II, III ihre Umschaltstellen.

     
  4. 4.

    Die durch Reizung der HW II, III hervorgerufene Vasodilatation der Nickhaut ist keine antidrome Aktion (Langley) gewöhnlicher sensibler Fasern der HW.

     
  5. 5.

    Die kleineren Blutgefäße der Nickhaut des Frosches besitzen eine “antagonistische, doppelte, efferente sympathische Innervation”: die efferent-sympathischen Fasern für die Vasodilatation ziehen durch die hintere Wurzel, die efferentsympathischen Fasern für die Vasokonstriktion durch die vordere Wurzel.

     

Résumé

  1. 1.

    Les stimulations des racines spinales postérieures II et III des grenouilles mugissantes provoquent une vasodilatation des petites artères de la membrane nictitante.

     
  2. 2.

    On a démontré que les impulsions vaso-dilatatrices, dues aux stimulations des racines postérieures II et III, pénètrent dans la chaîne sympathique, en passant à travers les rameaux communicants II et III, non pas le long des fibres nerveuses sensorielles ordinaires, mais par les fibres nerveuses autonomes efférentes dans les racines postérieures et les rameaux communicants.

     
  3. 3.

    On a confirmé physiologiquement qu'il existe des fibres vasodilatatrices efférentes de la membrane nictitante, dans les racines postérieures II et III des grenouilles mugissantes, et que les fibres vasodilatatrices ont leur origine dans le cadrant postérieur du cordon spinal, formant des stations cellulaires dans les ganglions spinaux II et III.

     
  4. 4.

    La vasodilatation de la membrane nictitante des grenouilles mugissantes, qui suit les stimulations des racines postérieures II et III, n'est pas imputable à l'action antidromique de Langley des nerfs sensoriels ordinaires dans les racines postérieures.

     
  5. 5.

    On a démontré que les petites artères de la membrane nictitante de la grenouille mugissante dépendant de ≪la double innervation sympathique efférente≫, en termes de fibres sympathiques vasodilatatrices efférentes, via les racines postérieures, et de fibres vasoconstrictrices sympathiques efférentes, via les racines antérieures.

     

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Kotsuka, K., andH. Naito, On the vasodilator action of efferent “sympathicus via posterior root”.Google Scholar
  2. 1a.
    —, andH. Naito, An efferent sympathetic double innervation of bull-frog's blood vessels. Acta neuroveget., Wien,23 (1962), 454–478.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 2.
    Kotsuka, K., andH. Naito, Comments on Langley's antidromic action on an experimental basis. Part I. Acta neuroveget., Wien,25 (1962), 106–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 3.
    Kotsuka, K., andH. Naito, Comments on Langley's antidromic action on an experimental basis. Part II. Acta neuroveget., Wien,25 (1962), 119–133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 4.
    Langley, J. N., andL. A. Orbeli, Observations on the sympathetic and sacral autonomic system of the frog. J. Physiol.41 (1910), 450–482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 5.
    Nakanishi, M., The antagonistic sympathetic innervation of the skeletal muscles. Nagai Shoten (Osaka)1958, 112.Google Scholar
  7. 6.
    Pick, J., Sympathectomy in amphibians. J. Comp. Neurol., Philadelphia,107 (1957), 169–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 7.
    Nakanishi, M., andH. Nishinaka, On the nerve cells in the spinal ganglia. J. Physiol. Soc. Japan23 (1961), 170–172.Google Scholar
  9. 8.
    Langley, J. N., andL. A. Orbeli, Some observations on the degeneration in the sympathetic and sacral autonomic nervous system of amphibia following nerve section. J. Physiol.42 (1911), 113–124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 9.
    Langley, J. N., The origin and course of the vaso-motor fibers of frog's foot. J. Physiol.41 (1910), 483–498.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 10.
    Nishinaka, H., On the location of the peripheral ganglionic cells of efferent myelinated autonomic nerve fibers contained in the spinal posterior roots. J. Physiol. Soc. Japan21 (1959), 785–790.Google Scholar
  12. 11.
    Daster, A., andJ. P. Morat, Comp. rend. Acad. sc.91 (1880), 393 (cited fromBayliss, W. M., The vasomotor system. Longmans, Green and Co., London, 1923).Google Scholar
  13. 12.
    Langley, J. N., andW. Dickinson, Proc. Roy. Soc.47 (1890), 379 (cited fromBurn, J. H., Sympathetic vasodilator fibers. Physiol. Rev., Baltimore,18 [1938], 140).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 13.
    Dale, H. H., On the actions of ergotoxine; with special reference to the existence of sympathetic vasodilators. J. Physiol.46 (1913), 291–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 14.
    Euler, U. S. v., andJ. N. Gaddum, Pseudomotor contractures after degeneration of the facial nerve. J. Physiol.73 (1931), 54–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 15.
    Bülbring, E., andJ. H. Burn, The sympathetic dilator fibers in the muscles of the cat and dog. J. Physiol.83 (1935), 483–501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 16.
    Folkow, B., K. Haeger andB. Uvnäs, Cholinergic vasodilator nerves in the sympathetic outflow to the muscules of the hindlimbs of the cat. Acta physiol. Scand.15 (1948), 401–411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaichi Kotsuka
    • 1
  • Hiroe Naito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyKansai Medical SchoolMoriguchi City, OsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations