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Moral duties of parents and nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children

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Abstract

Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive how certain moral principles, such as respect for personal autonomy, require us to act toward children. The results are also used to assess proposed federal regulations on research with children.

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Correspondence to Terrence F. Ackerman Ph.D..

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Ackerman, T.F. Moral duties of parents and nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. Bioethics Quarterly 2, 94–111 (1980). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00915263

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Keywords

  • Moral Principle
  • Clinical Research
  • Family Life
  • Permissible Limit
  • Federal Regulation