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Graphite into diamonds: Using teams to strengthen intracollegial interaction

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Abstract

In an information-processing organization, it is essential that lines of communications stay open and fluid, and that can best be accomplished through cooperative teamwork. In science, when graphite is subjected to extreme heat and pressure, it is converted into a diamond. When pressure is applied to a collegiate bureaucracy through retraining key personnel, it can be transformed into a team promoting unity and interaction. Strategies for developing teams are discussed.

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Mark D. Weber earned his Bachelor of Arts degree, with a major in Zoology, from the University of South Florida, his Master of Arts degree, with a major in Secondary Science Education, from Oral Roberts University, and his Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration from Oklahoma State University. After a career in which he provided orthopedic services to physicians and medical facilities, he taught in private schools and Tulsa Junior College before joining Oral Roberts University where he is Assistant Professor of Anatomy in the School of Medicine.

Thomas A. Karman earned his Bachelor of Arts degree, with majors in History and Political Science, from Albion College, his Master of Arts, with a major in East Asia Regional Studies, from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. in Higher Education from the University of Toledo. After serving The Defiance College as a faculty member and administrator, he joined Oklahoma State University, where he is Professor and Head of the department of Educational Administration and Higher Education.

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Weber, M.D., Karman, T.A. Graphite into diamonds: Using teams to strengthen intracollegial interaction. Innov High Educ 14, 49–56 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00889762

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Cross Cultural Psychology
  • Extreme Heat
  • Cooperative Teamwork