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Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the complement MAC inhibitor CD59 in multiple sclerosis and patients with other neurological disorders

Abstract

Rodent oligodendrocytes have a unique susceptibility among glia to the lytic effects of complement, due in part to a deficiency in CD59 (protectin), a key surface inhibitor of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC). The possibility that shedding of CD59 by human oligodendrocytes contributes to complement-mediated oligodendrocyte injury in inflammatory demyelinating disease has been investigated by estimating levels of CD59 in cerebrospinal fluid samples from 12 patients with demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and 13 with other neurological diseases. No significant differences were found between patients and controls, or between patients with active and those with clinically inactive demyelinating disease, providing no direct support for oligodendrocyte shedding of CD59 in multiple sclerosis.

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Correspondence to N. J. Scolding.

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Roddy, J., Clark, I., Hazleman, B.L. et al. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the complement MAC inhibitor CD59 in multiple sclerosis and patients with other neurological disorders. J Neurol 241, 557–560 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00873519

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Key words

  • Oligodendrocytes
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL; CD59; protectin)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid