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On-line computerized assessment of young children using the Minnesota Child Development Inventory

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Abstract

Psychiatric evaluation of the preschool-age child necessarily includes consideration of the child's developmental status as well as definition of symptoms and clarificaton of child and family dynamics. The Minnesota Child Development Inventory provides a means for the developmental evaluation of the preschool-age child that conserves professional time by using an inventory format to obtain the mother's observations of her child. A computerized version of the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, including administration, scoring, and an interpretive report, is described. This article also discusses some general considerations for computerized testing and the usefulness of the MCDI in child psychiatry.

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Author information

Correspondence to Louis J. Labeck.

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Labeck, L.J., Ireton, H. & Leeper, S.D. On-line computerized assessment of young children using the Minnesota Child Development Inventory. Child Psych Hum Dev 14, 49–54 (1983). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00709634

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Keywords

  • Young Child
  • Social Psychology
  • Child Development
  • General Consideration
  • Developmental Status