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Clinic children with poor peer relations: Who refers them and why?

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Abstract

Children who have poor peer relationships are at high risk for developing psychopathology in adulthood. Schools can provide an essential link between these children and mental health services by proper identification and referral. The role of schools in the referral process was evaluated for 298 boys and 98 girls seen at a child guidance clinic. Half of these referrals were made by schools, but referral because of poor peer relationships was unusual. It is suggested that teachers learns to attend more closely to children's social functioning as an important identifier of children at risk.

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Author information

Correspondence to Cynthia L. Janes PhD.

Additional information

This research was supported in part by National Institute of Mental Health Grant MH-24819 (E.J. Anthony, P.I.), by MH-23441 (L.K.Cass, P.I.), and by MH-07052 (E.J. Anthony, P.I.)

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Janes, C.L., Hesselbrock, V.M. & Schechtman, J. Clinic children with poor peer relations: Who refers them and why?. Child Psych Hum Dev 11, 113–125 (1980). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00707929

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Keywords

  • Mental Health
  • High Risk
  • Health Service
  • Social Psychology
  • Mental Health Service