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Alchornea cordifolia, a promising indigenous browse species adapted to acid soils in southeastern Nigeria for integrated crop-livestock agroforestry production systems

Abstract

Dry matter (DM) production, crude protein, phosphorus fibre contents and goat preference for eight indigenous browse species,Alchornea cordifolia, Diallum guineense, Ficus capensis, Baphia nitida, Manniophytum fulvum, Homalium aylmeri, Glyphaea brevis andRauwolfia vomitoria, and for two exotics,Leucaena leucocephala andGliricidia sepium, in cultivated plots were compared on acid soil in southeastern Nigeria. Total DM production was higher (P<0.05) forAlchornea cordifolia than for the other browse species.Glyphaea brevis andL. leucocephala were the most preferred species, whileA. cordifolia, G. sepium andR. vomitoria were the least. Mean crude protein content of browse species in this study was higher, whileP and neutral detergent fibre were lower than reported for other browse species in Nigeria. It is argued that the ultimate goal of a crop-livestock agroforestry system such as alley farming, could be better achieved through the complementary use of browse species.

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Larbi, A., Jabbar, M.A., Orok, E.J. et al. Alchornea cordifolia, a promising indigenous browse species adapted to acid soils in southeastern Nigeria for integrated crop-livestock agroforestry production systems. Agroforest Syst 22, 33–41 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00707468

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Key words

  • Alchornea cordifolia
  • browse species
  • alley farming
  • intensive feed garden
  • acid soils
  • southeastern Nigeria