Advertisement

Springer Nature is making Coronavirus research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

Effect of cooling rate on structure and hardness of quenched steel

  • 112 Accesses

  • 2 Citations

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    It was shown that by varying the relative motion of heated samples in water one can achieve very high cooling rates. A cooling rate of 7000 deg/sec at a depth of 1 mm can be attained in samples 6×6 ×8 mm.

  2. 2.

    The microhardness of low-carbon steel is increased by raising the cooling rate from 1000 to 7000 deg/sec during quenching.

  3. 3.

    In commercially pure iron (0.06% C) the increase in microhardness is accompanied by an increase in microdeformation and refining of the mosaic blocks; in steel with 0.15% C one observes only refining of the blocks, while the microdeformation decreases.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Literature cited

  1. 1.

    L. I. Lysak, Problems of Physics of Metals and Metal Science [in Russian], Izd. Akad. Nauk UkrSSR, No. 5 (1954).

  2. 2.

    L. I. Lysak, Problems of Physics of Metals and Metal Science [in Russian], Izd. Akad. Nauk UkrSSR, No. 6 (1955).

Download references

Additional information

Dnepropetrovsk State University. Translated from Metallovedenie i Termicheskaya Obrabotka Metallov, No. 4, pp. 73–74, April, 1967.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Vorob'ev, G.M., Siukhin, A.F. & Popova, V.I. Effect of cooling rate on structure and hardness of quenched steel. Met Sci Heat Treat 9, 325–326 (1967). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00652980

Download citation

Keywords

  • Iron
  • Cool Rate
  • Relative Motion
  • Cooling Rate
  • Pure Iron