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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 26, Issue 18, pp 5067–5074 | Cite as

Transient liquid-phase sintering of ceramic-reinforced Fe-based composites

  • S. J. Yankee
  • B. J. Pletka
Papers

Abstract

The microstructural development of ceramic-reinforced iron-based composites has been studied. The composites were fabricated via powder metallurgy and liquid-phase sintering, a processing route which achieves near-net-shape with good ceramic particulate dispersion. Two matrix alloys were used, Fe-1 wt% C-1 wt% Si and Fe-2 wt% Cu; up to 30 wt% (≈36 vol%) yttria-stabilized zirconia in the form of ∼20 μm particles was added to these alloys. The microstructural evolution of these composite materials was studied by examining the densification rate and volume fraction of liquid phase as a function of time. Different particle/matrix interfaces developed in the two composites. A glassy silicon-rich layer formed in the Fe-1C-1Si-YSZ composites and a more limited crystalline layer was found in the Fe-2Cu-YSZ composites.

Keywords

Polymer Zirconia Liquid Phase Composite Material Microstructural Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Yankee
    • 1
  • B. J. Pletka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Metallurgical and Materials EngineeringMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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