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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 28, Issue 17, pp 4704–4712 | Cite as

Effects of changes in strain path on the anisotropy of yield stresses of low-carbon steel and 70-30 brass sheets

  • Jae Hwan Chung
  • Dong Nyung Lee
Papers

Abstract

Uniaxial tensile tests in various directions following uniaxial extension, equibiaxial stretching or plane strain rolling have been performed to study the effects of changes in strain path on the anisotropy of yield stresses of aluminium-killed low-carbon steel and 70-30 brass sheets. The anisotropy could be predicted from the specimen textures, if dislocation structure were equiaxed, as in the case of equibiaxial stretching. However, elongated dislocation cell structures, developed in the steel specimens prestrained in uniaxial tension or plane strain rolling, gave rise to the second-stage yield stresses higher than predicted from textures in the directions different from the maximum prestrain direction. Planar dislocation structures in the brass specimens prestrained in uniaxial tension or plane strain rolling gave the second-stage yield stresses lower than predicted from the textures in the directions different from the maximum prestrain direction. The phenomena are discussed based on textures and dislocation structures.

Keywords

Anisotropy Tensile Test Cell Structure Uniaxial Tension Dislocation Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jae Hwan Chung
    • 1
  • Dong Nyung Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Center for Advanced Materials ResearchSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea

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