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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 1120–1128 | Cite as

The long-term behaviour of an aluminium-reinforced polyethylene pressure pipe

  • J. Bowman
Papers
  • 79 Downloads

Abstract

The long-term behaviour of an aluminium-reinforced polyethylene pressure pipe has been explored by undertaking stress rupture tests at 60 and 80 °C. The results of the tests showed these macrocomposite pipes have a time-dependent strength, such that with an increasing time under load the strength declined. In addition the pipes were weaker at 80 °C when compared to the 60 °C strength. The analysis of the influence of time and temperature on strength showed these multilayer pipes can be considered to behave as do conventional homogeneously structured plastic pipes, and that to describe the influence of time on the pipe strength, the accepted procedures developed for conventional plastics pipes can be applied. In addition the mode of failure of the pipes was examined. Pipe failure initiates by the strain-controlled failure of the reinforcing aluminium layer. The polyethylene layers then fail almost instantaneously in a ductile mode. This analysis of the mode of failure was supported by freeze-thaw cycling tests to − 25 °C and the 60 and 80 °C stress rupture tests.

Keywords

Polymer Aluminium Polyethylene Material Processing Cycling Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bowman
    • 1
  1. 1.Brunel UniversityUxbridgeUK

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