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Marine Biology

, Volume 64, Issue 3, pp 317–326 | Cite as

Influence of temperature and salinity on the uptake, distribution and depuration of mercury, cadmium and lead by the black-lip oyster Saccostrea echinata

  • G. R. W. Denton
  • C. Burdon-Jones
Article

Abstract

Saccostrea echinata (Quoy and Gaimard) were exposed to 10 μg 1-1 of either mercury, cadmium or lead at 30 °C, 36‰S; 30 °C, 20‰S; 20°C, 36‰S and 20°C, 20‰S for 30 d and were then transferred to clean seawater for a further 30 d to depurate. Specimens were removed at regular intervals during the exposure and depuration periods, dissected into gills, mantle, visceral mass and adductor, and analysed for the appropriate metal by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mercury was concentrated more than the other metals in all tissues under all conditions. Cadmium uptake was greater than lead in all tissue in the high-temperature experiments, whereas both metals were concentrated to similar extents at low temperature. The gill tissue generally accumulated the greatest amount of all 3 metals, whilst the adductor concentrated the least amount. At both salinities, mercury and cadmium accumulation by all tissues was significantly greater at the higher temperature whereas lead uptake was only marginally increased. The accumulation rates of mercury at high temperature were significantly greater in all tissues at low compared with high salinity, whereas at low temperature, differences were not significant. Accumulation rates of cadmium and lead in the majority of tissues examined were significantly greater in lowsalinity water at both temperatures. In general, lead was lost the most rapidly from oyster tissues, followed by mercury and then cadmium. The residence times for mercury and cadmium differed significantly between tissues, with the gills showing the highest turnover rate. In contrast, residence times for lead were similar between tissues. Losses of all 3 metals from oyster tissues were not obviously influenced by temperature and only mercury losses differed significantly between salinities.

Keywords

Mercury Cadmium Atomic Absorption High Salinity Turnover Rate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. W. Denton
    • 1
  • C. Burdon-Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marine Biology, School of Biological SciencesJames Cook University of North QueenslandTownsvilleAustralia

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