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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 31, Issue 7, pp 1675–1680 | Cite as

An emulsion method for producing fine, low density, high surface area silica powder from alkoxides

  • M. A. Butler
  • P. F. James
  • J. D. Jackson
Article

Abstract

Fine silica powders were prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of an emulsion of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) droplets in a continuous water phase. No additions of alcohol, as a mutual solvent for the TEOS and water, or of strong acid or base catalysts, as required in the more conventional sol-gel methods, were used. The emulsion was produced by mechanical mixing and was stabilized against separating out of the phases by increasing the viscosity of the water with a commercial thickening agent, Texipol.

The TEOS/water emulsion reacted to form into a loose particulate gel, which could be crushed to a powder after drying at 40 °C. The amorphous silica powders produced had low tapping densities (approximately 0.2 g cm−3), small particle sizes (<30 nm) and high specific surface areas (50–400 m2g−1).

Keywords

Alkoxide Amorphous Silica High Specific Surface Area Orthosilicate Tetraethyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Butler
    • 1
  • P. F. James
    • 1
  • J. D. Jackson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Engineering MaterialsUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  2. 2.Zortech International Ltd., Hadzor HallDroitwichUK

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