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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 30, Issue 22, pp 5793–5798 | Cite as

The influence of implanted chromium and yttrium on the oxidation behaviour of TiAl-based intermetallics

  • A. Gil
  • B. Rajchel
  • N. Zheng
  • W. J. Quadakkers
  • H. Nickel
Papers

Abstract

The influence of implanted chromium and yttrium on the oxidation behaviour of Ti-50Al (at %) in air at 800 °C was investigated. It was found that implanted chromium and/or yttrium leads to a decrease of the oxidation rate because an alumina scale was formed on the implanted material in the early stages of oxidation, whereas a titania-based scale grew on the non-implanted material. With increasing oxidation time the difference in oxidation behaviour between the implanted and non-implanted alloy gradually disappeared. These results show that chromium and yttrium, provided their concentration is properly chosen, can have a similar positive effect on the oxidation behaviour of TiAl-based intermetallics as they have on the oxidation behaviour of conventional Fe-, Ni-, or Co-based alumina-forming high temperature alloys.

Keywords

Oxidation Polymer Alumina Chromium Yttrium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Gil
    • 1
  • B. Rajchel
    • 2
  • N. Zheng
    • 3
  • W. J. Quadakkers
    • 3
  • H. Nickel
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Solid State ChemistryAcademy of Mining and MetallurgyAl. MickiewiczaPoland
  2. 2.Institute of Nuclear PhysicsKrakówPoland
  3. 3.Research Centre JülichInstitute for Materials in Energy SystemsJülichGermany

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