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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 29, Issue 21, pp 5773–5778 | Cite as

Coating of polymethylmethacrylate with transparent SiO2 thin films by a sol-gel method

  • R. Mizutani
  • Y. Oono
  • J. Matsuoka
  • H. Nasu
  • K. Kamiya
Papers

Abstract

In order to improve the surface characteristics of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), oxide thin-film coatings were applied using the sol-gel dip-coating technique. The Si(OC2H5)4 (TEOS), CH3Si(OC2H5)3 (MTES) or Ti(O-i-C3H7)4 (TIP) was used as a starting material for SiO2 or TiO2 coating. The hardness of the alkoxy-derived oxide-coated PMMA was increased from 200 MPa for non-coated PMMA with increasing film thickness. By optimizing the heating conditions and the hydrolysis conditions, and by repeating the dip-coating/heating processes, a hardness as high as 325 MPa was achieved in the PMMA triply coated with the TEOS-derived SiO2 film using the withdrawal velocity of 0.30 mms−1 and heat treatment at 80°C. The increase in hardness with the thickness of coating film was saturated before reaching that of bulk silica-dried gel (ca. 500 MPa), which may be due to the increased porous nature of the thick films.

Keywords

TiO2 SiO2 PMMA Polymethylmethacrylate Coating Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Mizutani
    • 1
  • Y. Oono
    • 1
  • J. Matsuoka
    • 1
  • H. Nasu
    • 1
  • K. Kamiya
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry for Materials, Faculty of EngineeringMie UniversityMie-kenJapan

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