Advertisement

Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 29, Issue 21, pp 5699–5702 | Cite as

Localized boriding of low-carbon steel using a Nd:YAG laser

  • M. Tayal
  • K. Mukherjee
Papers

Abstract

Localized boriding of low-carbon steel by the conventional technique requires tedious preboriding treatment and a long processing time. Laser boriding of low-carbon steel can be performed faster, and without any preboriding treatment. The feasibility of selective boriding of AISI 1018 steel using a Nd∶YAG laser has been investigated. High hardness in the range 950–2200 Hv was obtained during laser boriding of AISI 1018 steel. The wide range of hardness is due to the variety of microstructures possible during laser boriding. Electron microprobe analysis showed that the highest hardness (2200 Hv) was due to the formation of FeB, and the lowest hardness was due to a mixture of Fe2B and eutectic (αFe+Fe2B). The most desirable microstructure in laser boriding of AISI 1018 steel was found to be Fe2B, which incorporates a combination of a high hardness, in the range of 1300–1700 Hv, and a compressive stress at the treated surface.

Keywords

Polymer Microstructure Processing Time Compressive Stress Material Processing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W. LILIENTAL, in “Wear of Materials 1983”, edited by K. C. Ludema (ASME, New York, 1983) p. 556.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. P. EPIK, in “Boron and Refractory Borides”, edited by V. I. Matkovich (Springer, New York, 1977) p. 597.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    N. S. ZINOVICH, in “Diffusion Cladding of Metals”, edited by G. V. Samsonov (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1967) p. 43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    I. S. DUKAREVICH and M. A. BALTER, in “Protective Coatings on Metals I”, edited by G. V. Samsonov (Consultant Bureau, New York, 1969) p. 30.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    O. KUBASCHEWSKI, “Iron-Binary Phase Diagrams” (Springer, New York, 1982) p. 15.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. GOEURIOT, F. THEVENOT, J. H. DRIVER and T. MAGNIN, in “Advances in Surface Treatment”, edited by A. Niku-lari (Springer, New York, 1990) p. 171.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Y. KHAN, E. KNELLER and M. SOSTARICH, Z. Metallkde 73 (1982) 624.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Z. Z. LIN, Z. M. LING and X. C. SUN, in “Wear of Materials 1989”, edited by K. C. Ludema (ASME, New York, 1989) p. 51.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    T. S. EYRE, Wear 34 (1975) 383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Tayal
    • 1
  • K. Mukherjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and MechanicsMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

Personalised recommendations