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Increased expression of phosphotyrosine after axotomy in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nucleus

Abstract

To investigate the role of tyrosine kinase underlying glial cell proliferation after axotomy, the localization of phosphotyrosine was studied immunohistochemically in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nucleus after nerve transection in adult rats. An anti-phosphotyrosine antibody weakly stained the cytoplasm of the neurons and some glial cells on the control side of both nuclei, while preferentially staining the plasma membrane of perineuronal microglial cells and neurons weakly on the severed side 2 days after axotomy and intensely between 3 and 7 days. Some of the microglial cells reacted positively with both anti-bromodeoxyuridine and antiphosphotyrosine antibodies, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is involved in microglial cell proliferation. Proliferation of numerous microglial cells was observed in the severed nuclei between 2 and 4 days after axotomy, while only a few were detected on days 5 and 7. These findings suggest that tyrosine kinase is involved in not only the proliferation of perineuronal microglial cells but also in some retrograde neuronal reactions such as differentiation and regeneration.

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Correspondence to Eiji Yamada.

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Yamada, E., Kataoka, H., Isozumi, T. et al. Increased expression of phosphotyrosine after axotomy in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nucleus. Acta Neuropathol 88, 14–18 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00294354

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Key words

  • Axonal reaction
  • Proliferation
  • Phosphotyrosine
  • Neuron
  • Microglia