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Incorporation of hygromycin resistance in Brassica nigra and its transfer to B. napus through asymmetric protoplast fusion

Summary

With the idea to develop a selection system for asymmetric somatic hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and black mustard (B. nigra), the marker gene hygromycin resistance was introduced in this last species by protoplast transformation with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 pGV 3850 HPT. The B. nigra lines used for transformation had been previously selected for resistance to two important rape pathogens (Phoma lingam, Plasmodiophora brassicae). Asymmetric somatic hybrids were obtained through fusion of X-ray irradiated (mitotically inactivated) B. nigra protoplasts from transformed lines as donor with intact protoplasts of B. napus, using the hygromycin resistance as selection marker for fusion products. The somatic hybrids hitherto obtained expressed both hygromycin phosphotransferase and nopaline synthase genes. Previous experience with other plant species had demonstrated that besides the T-DNA, other genes of the donor genome can be co-transferred. In this way, the produced hybrids constitute a valuable material for studying the possibility to transfer agronomically relevant characters — in our case, diseases resistances — through asymmetric protoplast fusion.

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Communicated by G. Wenzel

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Sacristán, M.D., Gerdemann-Knörck, M. & Schieder, O. Incorporation of hygromycin resistance in Brassica nigra and its transfer to B. napus through asymmetric protoplast fusion. Theoret. Appl. Genetics 78, 194–200 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00288799

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Key words

  • Agrobacterium-transformation
  • Asymmetric protoplast fusion
  • Brassica napus
  • Brassica nigra