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Leadership ratings for male and female military cadets

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Abstract

Ratings of leadership ability for 1096 male and 91 female cadets at the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) were examined for gender differences. Males were rated significantly higher than females for two of the three rating periods. Correlates of these ratings were examined in an effort to explore the meaning of such ratings for males and females. For both male and female cadets, situationally specific correlates of leadership ratings were identified. Physical ability and performance were most highly correlated with leadership ratings during summer training camp, while academic ability and performance were most highly correlated with these ratings during the academic year. These correlations were generally higher for females than for males. The value of such information to organizational newcomers and the means by which such information might be transmitted to them were discussed.

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Author information

Correspondence to Robert W. Rice.

Additional information

This research was supported by Grant MDA 903-78-G-02 from the Army Research Institute for Behavioral and Social Sciences (Jerome Adams, Principal Investigator), and by the Office of Institutional Research at the United States Military Academy. The views expressed herein are the private opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the policy of the U.S. Army, the U.S. Military Academy, or ARI.

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Rice, R.W., Yoder, J.D., Adams, J. et al. Leadership ratings for male and female military cadets. Sex Roles 10, 885–901 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00288512

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Keywords

  • Gender Difference
  • Social Psychology
  • Rating Period
  • Physical Ability
  • Academic Ability