Advertisement

Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

The relationship between sex role stereotypes and requisite management characteristics among college students

Abstract

The relationship between sex role stereotypes and characteristics perceived as necessary for management success was examined among male and female undergraduate management students and compared with results of managers today as well as with those of managers studied 15 years ago. Male management students, similar to their managerial counterparts in the 1980s and 1970s, still adhere to the male managerial stereotype and perceive that successful middle managers possess characteristics, attitudes, and temperaments more commonly ascribed to men in general than to women in general. Female management students, similar to today's female managers, no longer sex type the managerial job, a change from the female managers of the 1970s. Implications of these outcomes for undergraduate management education are discussed.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Brenner, O. C., Tomkiewicz, J., & Schein, V. E. The relationship between sex role stereotypes and requisite management characteristics revisited. Academy of Management Journal, 1989, (In Press).

  2. Dubno, P. Attitudes towards women executives: A longitudinal approach. Academy of Management Journal, 1985, 28, 235–239.

  3. Hays, W. L. Statistics for psychologists. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1963.

  4. Jones, G. P., & Jacklin, C. N. Changes in sexist attitudes toward women during introductory women's and men's studies courses. Sex Roles, 1988, 18, 611–622.

  5. Powell, G. N., & Butterfield, D. A. The “Good Manager”: Does androgyny fare better in the 1980's? Presented at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, August 1986.

  6. Schein, V. E. The relationship between sex role stereotypes and requisite management characteristics. Journal of Applied Psychology, 1973, 57, 95–100.

  7. Schein, V. E. The relationship between sex role stereotypes and requisite characteristics among female managers. Journal of Applied Psychology, 1975, 60, 340–344.

  8. Schein, V. E. Sex role stereotyping, ability and performance: Prior research and new directions. Personnel Psychology, 1978, 31, 259–268.

  9. Trafford, A., Avery, R., Thorton, J., Carey, J., Galloway, J., & Sanoff, A. She's come a long way — Or has she? U.S. News and World Report, August 6, 1984, pp. 44–51.

Download references

Author information

Additional information

Portions of this research were funded by a Gettysburg College Institutional Self Renewal Grant.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Schein, V.E., Mueller, R. & Jacobson, C. The relationship between sex role stereotypes and requisite management characteristics among college students. Sex Roles 20, 103–110 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00288030

Download citation

Keywords

  • College Student
  • Social Psychology
  • Management Characteristic
  • Management Education
  • Management Success