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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 15, Issue 8, pp 543–548 | Cite as

Correspondence

  • P. W. Allen
  • M. Thornton
  • M. W. G. Gordon
  • C. E. Robertson
  • J. Dawes
  • K. R. Hughes
  • R. F. Armstrong
  • L. Coolen
  • J. Dens
  • E. Baeck
  • C. Claes
  • R. L. Lins
  • H. Verbraeken
  • R. Daelemans
  • J. Gilbert
  • B. Smith
  • A. Davenport
  • K. Aulton
  • R. B. Payne
  • E. J. Will
  • C. Guerin
  • B. Pozzetto
  • F. Berthoux
Article

Keywords

Public Health Emergency Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. W. Allen
    • 1
  • M. Thornton
  • M. W. G. Gordon
  • C. E. Robertson
    • 2
  • J. Dawes
  • K. R. Hughes
    • 3
  • R. F. Armstrong
  • L. Coolen
  • J. Dens
  • E. Baeck
  • C. Claes
  • R. L. Lins
  • H. Verbraeken
  • R. Daelemans
    • 4
  • J. Gilbert
    • 5
  • B. Smith
    • 5
  • A. Davenport
    • 6
  • K. Aulton
  • R. B. Payne
  • E. J. Will
  • C. Guerin
    • 7
  • B. Pozzetto
  • F. Berthoux
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiaRoyal Brisbane HospitalHerstonAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Accident and Emergency MedicineRoyal Infirmary of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  3. 3.Department of Medicine 5th Floor Jules Thorn InstituteMiddlesex HospitalLondonUK
  4. 4.Medical Intensive Therapy UnitA. Z. StuivenbergAntwerpenBelgium
  5. 5.Health Science Center at San AntonioThe University of TexasSan AntonioUSA
  6. 6.Department of Renal MedicineSt. James's University HospitalLeedsUK
  7. 7.Service de Néphrologie, Dialyse et TransplantationHôpital NordSaint-Pries-en-JarezFrance

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