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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 97–101 | Cite as

Genetic control of endosperm proteins in wheat

1. The use of high resolution one-dimensional gel electrophoresis for the allocation of genes coding for endosperm protein subunits in the common wheat cultivar chinese spring
  • G. Galili
  • M. Feldman
Article

Summary

Total endosperm protein subunits, extracted from the common wheat cultivar Chinese Spring and from some of its aneuploid lines, were fractionated according to their molecular weight (MW) in an improved high resolution one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The resolution obtained by this method and, in particular, that of the high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin and gliadin subunits approached that of a previous report in which two-dimensional fractionation system based on charge and MW was used. In the cultivar Chinese Spring, 21 discrete protein bands were resolved and the chromosomes controlling many of them were either reconfirmed, or, in some cases, established. The advantages of this high resolution SDS PAGE technique are discussed.

Key words

Common wheat Triticum aestivum Electrophoresis Endosperm proteins 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Galili
    • 1
  • M. Feldman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant GeneticsThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael

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