Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) plasma levels after simultaneous oral and intramuscular administration in cancer patients

  • 15 Accesses

  • 4 Citations

Summary

After simultaneous administration of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) 1,000 mg PO and 1,000 mg IM to ten cancer patients, we observed mean plasma MAP profiles that could be exactly superimposed on the two absorption/decay curves obtained after administration of single doses IM or PO. Treatment with MAP given simultaneously by the IM and PO routes may be effective in overcoming the drawbacks of both routes, and can also more reliably guarantee plasma levels in the therapeutic range.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. 1.

    Nie NH, Hull CH, Jenkins JG, Steinbrenner K, Bent DH (1980) SPSS Statistical package for the social sciences, 2e. éd. McGraw-Hill, New York

  2. 2.

    Pannuti F, Martoni A, Fruet F, Strocchi E, Di Marco AR (1979) Hormone therapy in advanced breast cancer: High-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) vs tamoxifen (TMX). Preliminary results. In: Mouridsen HT, Palshof T (eds) Breast cancer. Experimental and clinical aspects. Pergamon press, London, pp 93–98

  3. 3.

    Pannuti F, Camaggi CM, Strocchi E, Giovannini M, Di Marco AR, Costanti B (1981) Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP): Relative bioavailability after single high-dose administration in cancer patients. Cancer Treat Rep

Download references

Author information

Correspondence to Franco Pannuti.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Pannuti, F., Camaggi, C.M., Strocchi, E. et al. Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) plasma levels after simultaneous oral and intramuscular administration in cancer patients. Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 9, 122–123 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00265393

Download citation

Keywords

  • Acetate
  • Cancer Patient
  • Cancer Research
  • Plasma Level
  • Single Dose