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Use of “bollards” to improve patient access during intensive care

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Abstract

Permanent floor-mounted “bollards” have been installed in three Intensive Care Areas in the Oxford Teaching Hospitals. Each brings services to one bed and, because access around the head is greatly improved in comparison with the conventional arrangement with the head next to the wall, facilitates both emergency and routine care and improves the safety of the working environment for staff and patients. Differences between the bollards installed in the three units are described and the advantages and disadvantages of each discussed. It is concluded that a bollard should be located to the left of the head of the bed and that it should be about 1100 mm high and 500 mm square. At least two oxygen and vacuum outlets, one air outlet, six electric power sockets and connections for monitoring cables should be provided on the bollard with further power sockets on the adjacent wall. A length of equipment rail mounted across the head of the bed supports the suction equipment required for oral and respiratory tract care and storage space is provided on and below the work surface which is mounted on the wall behind the head of the bed.

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Kerr, J.H., Coates, D.P. & Gale, L.B. Use of “bollards” to improve patient access during intensive care. Intensive Care Med 11, 33–38 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00256063

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Key words

  • Bollards
  • Intensive Care Unit