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Propylene oxide production from propylene by immobilized whole cells of Methylosinus sp. CRL 31 in a gas-solid bioreactor

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Summary

Methanotrophic bacteria have been shown to oxidize gaseous alkenes to the corresponding epoxides utilizing an NADH2-dependent methane monooxygenase. A cell paste of methane-grown methylotrophs was coated on porous glass beads. The production of propylene oxide from propylene was performed in a gas-solid bioreactor to ensure continuous production and removal of product epoxide from the microenvironment of the biocatalyst. The amount of propylene oxide produced before cofactor regeneration was between 120–145 μmoles/20 mg cells in about 10 h depending on the microbial strains used. The conversion rate for propylene was 2.7%. Regeneration of cofactor NADH2 was performed in the bioreactor with the vapor of a cosubstrate, methanol.

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Hou, C.T. Propylene oxide production from propylene by immobilized whole cells of Methylosinus sp. CRL 31 in a gas-solid bioreactor. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 19, 1–4 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00252808

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Keywords

  • Propylene
  • Alkene
  • NADH2
  • Epoxide
  • Conversion Rate